Sunday

Sunday

3D pink and green

3D pink and green
3D pink and green
3D pink and green
3D pink and green
3D pink and green

Wednesday

blue 3d wallpaper

blue 3d wallpaper
blue 3d wallpaper

Dark green background

Dark green background
Dark green background

Tuesday

blue eyes shining dragon

blue eyes shining dragon

Green eyes wallpapers

Green eyes wallpapers

Arugula Corn Salad with Bacon

This is a salad of bold flavors, but somehow they all manage to work together well. Sweet corn tossed with peppery arugula, bacon, onion, cumin, and wine vinegar to balance the sweet corn, and you have stimulated all the major tastes your tongue can perceive. If you have a grill, and the time, I highly recommend grilling the corn (in their husks) for this recipe; the smokey flavor just can't be beat.


Arugula Corn Salad with Bacon Recipe
INGREDIENTS
4 large ears of corn
2 cups of chopped arugula (about one bunch)
4 strips of bacon, cooked, chopped
1/3 cup chopped green onions
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp white wine vinegar
1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Dad's Greek Salad

I'm on vacation this week, so am pulling forward a few recipes from the archives that we've recently updated. This gorgeous Greek salad is one of them, originally posted in 2005. So pretty, isn't it? And perfect for the hot weather. ~Elise

anesthesia and intensive care medicine journal

Price development in important anesthesia and critical care medicine journals in comparison to journals of other disciplines.
Boldt J, Maleck WH, Fent T.
Source
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Klinikum der Stadt Ludwigshafen, Germany. BoldtJ@gmx.net
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
In today's climate of financial restrictions, libraries and individual subscribers complain about the price increase of scientific journals. The development in prices of anesthesia/critical care journals was analysed over the past 6 years and compared to prices of some journals of other disciplines.

METHODS:
Important journals in the categories Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine & Critical Care, Surgery, Medicine (General), and Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems listed in the 1999 Science Citation Index of Journal Citation Report were included and prices for the years 1995 to 2000 were analysed.

RESULTS:
Increase in prices ranged from +13% to +199%. The mean increase in journal prices was lowest in the category Anesthesiology (+61%), higher in the category Critical Care (+73%), and highest in the category Medicine, General (+101%). Changes in the impact factor (IF) varied widely, ranging from a decrease (Lancet: -43%; J Neurosurg Anesth: -44%) to a tremendous increase (e.g. Reg Anesth +165%; Ann Emerg Med +149%). The journals' size (number of articles or pages) did not increase proportionally with the increase in prices.

CONCLUSION:
A disproportionate rise in journal prices was seen over the past 6 years. The large increase in cost may have multiple reasons. The rapidly increasing cost of research journals may affect research quality because economic pressure may result in reduction in availibility of information due to cancellation of subscriptions to journals.

PMID: 11300384 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Monday

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migraine aura without headache causes

People with migraine and aura
deal with frightening symptoms . . .

Discovering that you have migraine and aura may be a partial relief, because the symptoms can range from the severe to the bizarre, and you may think they're doing permanent damage. However, knowing what it is doesn't take away from the problem itself! So what causes aura in the first place?


In another article we discuss the cause of migraine, which may give us clues into the migraine and aura symptoms. In migraine, blood vessels and blood flow in your head is effected. For some time doctors have believes that decreased blood flow to brain cells (and so a decrease in oxygen) may cause aura. Doctors now also believe that over-excitement of the brain cells may also be a cause.
What is aura?

Aura refers to the symptoms that about 15-20% of migraineurs deal with before their headache begins (and sometimes during the headache as well). This is called the prodromal stage.* On the positive side, aura can give someone a warning that a severe headache is about to begin before it hits full force. In some people, though, the aura may be almost as bad as the migraine itself! (Note: Some put the % much higher. It's hard to estimate because some migraineurs are believed to experience aura hours or even days before the actual "headache".)
* Sometimes this is broken into two stages, prodromal, and aura. The prodromal stage may last a day or more, and the aura stage is usually just a few minutes. Both stages are considered together in this article.

Yes, but what exactly is it?!

Migraine and aura may both include a number of symptoms or a combination of symptoms (you can find out more about other symptoms of migraines here). If you've heard anything about aura, you've heard that some migraineurs have visual disturbances: they may see flashing lights, jagged lines, circles, squares, or distortions of things they see. Objects may seem further away or closer. Visual distortions due to migraine have been said to have inspired Lewis Carroll in his book Through the Looking Glass. You can get it from Amazon for a couple of dollars – it makes an interesting read if you suffer from migraines! - Check it out!
But aura can go beyond this to things like dizziness, ringing in the ears, trouble focusing, slurred speech or trouble finding the right word when you talk (aphasia). You may smell an odour that isn't there (some migraineurs just will not be convinced that they don't have horrible BO!). Some have numbness or tingling in hands, feet or lips (lasting about 20 minutes). Yawning. Thirst. Irritability or euphoria. Stiff neck. Some people just have a gradually coming on "not right" feeling, or wake up feeling like they've been "hit by a train." In rare cases even amnesia or advanced hallucinations. You can imagine how many of these symptoms could be quite frightening if you're experiencing them for the first time!

The book Migraine and other Headaches by Drs Young and Silberstein has an excellent description of migraine and aura and how to tell what you have.

Along with other symptoms of migraine, the aura has often been expressed in art (particularly the visual auras). If you want to get a better idea what the visual aura is really like, take a look at some of this migraine aura art.
How long does aura last?

Usually between 20-40 minutes before the migraine begins. Migraine and aura are linked so that many sufferers have more aura symptoms during the migraine as well. Some even get aura without the actual migraine pain (silent migraine or migraine aura without headache)! Whatever the case, the same treatments will probably need to be investigated. The true "prodromal" stage may start a day or two before the headache, and usually consists of the symptoms of feeling "under the weather" or irritable, or just tired.
What can I do about migraine and aura?

First, work with your doctor. She will first attempt to rule out problems that can cause serious permanent damage to your body (such as glaucoma, in which there is severe pressure and pain in one eye).
Your doctor may prescribe a medication for you. For many people, this will eliminate or alleviate the symptoms of both migraine and aura. Other people may have to live with the symptoms for a while (wander around thiswebsite for migraine-killing ideas! Also an excellent resource on migraine and aura and other symptoms is Conquering Your Migraine by Dr Seymour Diamond).

Keep on the lookout for sudden changes in the migraine and aura pattern, and talk to your doctor again. She's there to help, so if she brushes you off or won't listen, find another doctor or consider a headache specialist. Don't let migraine and aura stop you from living!

migraine gel stat

Gelstat Migraine has two Ingredients Just for Migraines

Gelstat migraine is a homeopathic treatment for the relief of migraines.
Gelstat contains two ingredients, and both are used for migraine relief with good success for many. Feverfew, and ginger are the main ingredients in gelstat migraine. Both have been used for hundreds of years before conventional medicines were born for headache relief.

Ginger has been used in Asian cultures to prevent migraines for many years. Add both feverfew, and ginger together, and you have a migraine treatment.

Gestalt is a unique over the counter medicine for migraines unlike excedrin migraine, and advil migraine.

Although you can buy ginger supplements such as ginger capsules, and the same for feverfew, adding both for the gelstat migraine ingredients, is much more effective.

Gelstat Migraines reviews

Two clinical trials have been conducted on GelStat Migraine, both yielding excellent results.

The first was an open label study that was performed by Roger K. Cady, M.D. and Curtis P. Schreiber, M.D., both of ClinVest, the research division of the Headache Care Center in Springfield, Missouri.
The second was a double blind study performed by Dr. Sheena K. Aurora. Dr. Aurora is a co-director of the Swedish Headache Center in Seattle, a specialty headache clinic that treats more than 3,000 patients each year. She is also board-certified in neurology and electrodiagnostic medicine as well as has additional qualifications in clinical neurophysiology.

What the Gelstat Migraine review found!!!! During mild pain forty eight percent, that's cutting close to one half, of the participants were without pain two hours after their treatment.

Eighty three percent were without pain or had just mild pain two hours after treatment.

And their migraine symptoms were gone two hours after their treatment in over half of the migraine participants.

Forty one percent thought that gelstat migraine was equal to their pre study medicine or preferred gelstat.

Four migraine sufferers reported gelstat migraine side effects. Three disliked the taste. And only one had burning under the tongue.

As you know all to well, nothing works all of the time for a migraine sufferer. But with results like those above, that's not bad. Ok, so why is it different from advil migraine? Advil migraine is a pain reliever. It, like many more pain pills, especially over the counter just offer pain relief. That's why they are called pain pills. Gelstat migraine is an abortive.

But strangely all abortions can give rebound headaches if used to much, and this happens to many migraine sufferers. It starts slowly without one noticing, and then you may have a daily headache, thanks to the very drug that was helping.

( We had a woman to e-mail, and said her head hurt all of the time, and she was taking one Imitrex a day for migraine!!!!!)

But jump for joy on Gelstat Migrane.

Although it's used as an abortive, it won't cause rebound headaches. It's two herbs put together. And feverfew, or butterbur won't give you a headache.

How to take gelstat migraine. While just about everything is swallowed, gelstat is a sublingual delivery system, meaning you put it on your tongue, and it dissolves quickly. As you know, this is a fast way to absorb medicine, goes in to your blood stream quicker, and doesn't upset your stomach.

What you get from this is,

* Fast for quick relief

* No reported side effects

* One imitrex may cost fifteen to twenty dollars depending where you buy them, and we've bought many, whereas gelstat migraine only cost a couple of bucks. Stock up on a few to have handy.

* Available over the counter, without you having to get a prescription

*And it's a pre measured dose, the dispensers are convenient, safe, and effective.

GelStat Migrane has been shown to be an effective treatment for those with moderate to severe migraine. We think this product is worth checking out. It's only a couple of bucks, also used to abort a migraine, without side effects. You have nothing to lose but your migraine.

Our last page is about an abortive, that also dissolves under your tongue, works quickly, but comes with a possibility of side effects. It comes from the triptan family, and is called maxalt migraine. Our next page is about migraine pain relief.

migraine emedicine pediatrics

Overview of Pediatric Migraine
Migraines are incapacitating, throbbing headaches frequently located in the temples or frontal head regions. In children, the headaches are often bilateral (frontotemple) and may be nonthrobbing. Aura is infrequent prior to age 8 years. During the migraine episode, the child often looks ill and pale. Nausea and vomiting are frequent, particularly in young children. Patients avoid light (photophobia), noise (phonophobia), strong odors, and movement. Relief typically follows sleep.

Initial evaluation focuses on excluding other conditions. Management consists of identifying triggering factors, providing pain relief, and considering prophylaxis.

Migraine is a common disorder among the young. Estimates indicate that 3.5-5% of all children will experience recurrent headaches consistent with migraine. As in adults, most children (approximately 60%) have migraine without aura. Approximately 18% have only migraine with aura, 13% have both, and 5% experience only aura.

Several conditions that are relatively common in the pediatric population and are thought to be variations and/or precursors of migraine include the following:

Benign paroxysmal vertigo
Cyclic vomiting
Paroxysmal torticollis
Transient global amnesia (rare in children)
Acute confusional migraine
For other discussions on migraine headaches, see the overview topic Migraine Headaches, as well as the articles Migraine Variants and Migraine-Associated Vertigo.

migraine emedicine neurology

Introduction

Date of Most Recent Substantive Amendment: 2003 11 18

Background

Feverfew extract is a herbal remedy used for preventing attacks of migraine.

Objectives

To systematically review the evidence from double – blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the clinical efficacy and safety of feverfew versus placebo for preventing migraine.

Search strategy

Publications describing (or which might describe) double – blind RCTs of feverfew extract for migraine were sought through the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2003); PREMEDLINE/MEDLINE (1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (1974 to July 2003); the trials register of the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive care group (July 2003); and AMED (1985 to July 2003). Manufacturers of feverfew were contacted and the bibliographies of identified articles checked for further trials.

Selection criteria

Randomised, placebo – controlled, double – blind trials assessing the efficacy of feverfew for preventing migraine were included. Trials using clinical outcome measures were included. Trials focusing exclusively on physiological parameters were excluded. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication.

Data collection and analysis

Data on patients, interventions, methods, outcome measures, results and adverse events were extracted systematically. Methodological quality was evaluated using the scoring system developed by Jadad and colleagues. Two reviewers independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Disagreements concerning evaluation of individual trials were resolved through discussion.

Main results

Five trials (343 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Results from these trials were mixed and did not convincingly establish that feverfew is efficacious for preventing migraine. Only mild and transient adverse events were reported in the included trials.

Authors' conclusions

There is insufficient evidence from randomised, double – blind trials to suggest an effect of feverfew over and above placebo for preventing migraine. It appears from the data reviewed that feverfew presents no major safety problems.

migraine skank lyrics gracious k

Gracious K - Migraine Skank lyrics
Send "Migraine Skank" Ringtone to your Cell

Man i said show me how you get down,
Man i said swear down,
I wanna see the migrain skank yeah,
Lemme see the migrain skank yeah,
I wanna see the migrain skank,
Two hands on the head that's the migrain skank yeah, ehh yo, what's gwarning, err those who don't know, lemme take you through this dance yeah, it's easy, i swear down stay with the actives watch;

First step you take your right hand,
Next step you take your left hand,
And then you put both hands in the air,
And then you show me the migrain skank
Blud i wanna see the migrain skank,
Don't stop popping that migrain skank,
Rude girl show me the migrain skank,
Rude boy show mw the migrain skank,
It's like jump in the middle and skank,
Put two hands on the head and skank,
Man a like show me how you get down man i said swear down,
[ repeat ]

They know me as case swear down, show me how you get down swear down, just show me how you get down swear down, man i said show me how you get down, man a like swear down.

[ repeat ]

Migraine kool'n soothe

Kool 'n' Soothe: Cooling relief

Kool 'n' Soothe provides you and your children instant cooling relief from swelling, bruises, sprains, migraine or fever. Don't fuss about with messy wet flannels or a frozen bag of peas, there is sure to be a Kool n Soothe product perfect for your families needs.

iphone 5 release date in singapore

iPhone 5 Release Date In Singapore 2011: Is The IPhone 5 Release Date Just Around The Corner? | Premiership The online tech community are saying that they believe that the iPhone 5 release date could be earlier than expected.
This article submitted by Amanda. Feel free to comment but no SPAM. We hate SPAM and SCAM. If you have opinion, ideas or additional information about this topic iphone 5 release, support us by submitting it and share together with your friends all over the world. Buy the ebook or tutorial guide, if you want to learn more.